Moondance Contributors


Cynthia Collett

Cynthia Collett lives in Spokane, Washington where she works with a large, private, non-profit, social service agency. Most of her writing is fictionalized autobiography about her life in prison, her ancestors, and whatever else strikes her fancy at the moment. She is currently at work on a novel about women in prison.

Cynthia Collett's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Cynthis Collett at quillter@cet.com.


Donna Cross

Donna Cross grew up in Southern California. After graduating from the University of California at San Diego she moved to the Bay Area. She is now a mom/poet/instructional assistant living in Mountain View with her husband, Tom, and their two children.

Donna Cross's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Donna Cross at cross@best.com.


Marguerite Floyd

Marguerite Floyd is a writer of poems, articles e-mail, and anything else that feels interesting. She lives in Lexington, Kentucky amid suburban neighbors who are generally sober, peaceful and quiet.

Marguerite Floyd's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Marguerite Floyd at editor@ukcc.uky.edu.


Akua Lezli Hope

Akua Lezli Hope has won a Creative Writing Fellowship from The National Endowment For The Arts, an Artists Fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts, and a Ragdale U.S.- Africa Fellowship, among other honors. Her collection, EMBOUCHURE, poems on jazz and other musics, was published by ArtFarm Press in 1995, and won the Writer's Digest 1995 Book Award for poetry.

Her work appears in several anthologies including SISTERFIRE, an anthology of Black Womanist Fiction and Poetry, HarperPerennial; EROTIQUE NOIRE, an anthology of Black Erotica, Doubleday/Anchor; and CONFIRMATION, an anthology of Afrikan American Women Writers, Quill/Morrow; as well as numerous literary magazines.

Akua is a third generation New Yorker, firstborn, with degrees from Williams College and Columbia University in psychology, journalism, and business. Born in Manhattan, she grew up in the South Bronx and Queens, and misses Park Slope and the Village. (All donations of brownstones gratefully accepted).

Akua bears an exile's desire for work close to home, and a writer's yearning for a galvanizing mythos. She is at work on her first novel. She sings, organizes, gardens, takes pictures, plays with her saxophone and her cats, reshapes thread, works well, and makes good dreams manifest.

Akua Lezli Hope's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Akua Lezli Hope at 71220.1665@compuserve.com. You can also visit her Web Site.


Loretta Kemsley

Loretta Kemsley is the president of Sandcastle Publications, an award winning journalist, a freelance writer/editor and a coach in the art of writing. Her past credits include editor-in-chief of "The Free Spirit" and "Minority Employment News".

Loretta Kemsley's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Loretta Kemsley at scorpio@artnet.net.


Jarrin Kendall

Jarrin Kendall is an African/Native American woman originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania now living in San Antonio, Texas. She is employed as Director of Computer Systems at a law school and holds a B.S. in Information Science from the University of Pittsburgh. She is the mother of two sons, Calvin and Kendall.Jarrin Kendall is an African/Native American woman originally from Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania now living in San Antonio, Texas. She is employed as Director Information Technology for a non-profit agency in San Antonio and holds a B.S. in Information Science from the University of Pittsburgh. She is the mother of two sons, Calvin and Kendall. She is currently at work on her first novel scheduled for publication in 2006.

Jarrin Kendall's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Jarrin Kendall at jarrinkendall@spiritfilledlove.com.


Adrianne Mondello

A third generation American of Italian descent, Dria learned early the value of a hearty laugh, excellent food, and a loud voice. ::smile:: Much of her writing is influenced by the memories, stories, and examples of her Nona, Grandmother, and Mother. Born and raised on the beaches of Southern California, it is no surprise that water and the ocean figure into her life so prominently. Dria currently resides in New Mexico.

Adrianne Mondello's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Adrianne Mondello at StoryTeiier@aol.com.


Terrie I. Murray

Terrie Murray was a contributor to "Moondance" for it's September, 1995 edition and now serves as Nonfiction Editor. Her writing ranges from nonfiction to short fiction, with brief journeys into poetry. In addition to her writing, Ms. Murray is also a musician with the Zivo Bitov Ensemble, which specializes in the music of Bulgaria and Macedonia on traditional acoustic instruments. Although her writing crosses several genres, Ms. Murray is perhaps best known for her writings about wild birds, for which she was given the nickname "Aviella, Watcher of the Winged Ones."

Terrie I. Murray's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Terrie I. Murray at timurray@teleport.com.


Beverley Peden

Bev Peden was born in Canada and lives there with her family.

Although quite an artistically gifted child, Beverly formally began to paint seriously about 1983. She has always been involved in drawing, but never in a formal way as her upbringing mandated that college or university was inappropriate for a girl.

After she married, with the encouragement of her husband and the support of a couple of special friends, she rented a garage in Kenya in which to "flail paint". This evolved into the trio going to the local lumber yard and purchased enough lumber to build a twelve by eighteen foot shack at the back of their compound, thatched it with grass, and she continued painting.

When they returned to Canada, Peden enrolled in the University of Victoria and completed a term there. She then located a small art college, the Victoria College of Art, a school boasting some very proficient artists, but with no "degree" program that would be recognized elsewhere. She was quite pleased with the goals of the art program, and completed a year there. "The focus of the instructors and the environment they created allowed for exploration and experimentation on a very gut level, all within the discipline of developing a process for discovery.", she says. After experiencing cervical cancer, she found herself emotionally raw and open. This emotional rift resulted in her art becoming an ongoing dialogue, educating her in matters of the soul and in learning to trust her responses. Her work began to grow.

By the time she went to Uganda in 1989, one of the most productive and important periods of her life, she'd had two exhibitions. Her husband, Don, supported her in taking enough art materials with her to set up her studio for the next five year period. Becoming involved with the women in her new community of Kabale, she began to see a new element of honesty reflected in her work. She quotes: "With no other artists, no art magazines, no schools of thought, and no "sophisticated" critics to undermine my own self confidence, this kind of isolation was exactly what I needed to get down to the act of getting my ego out of the way and let my heart do the seeing.

She has spent a total of 15 years living in East Africa. Primarily a visual artist, and recently a writer, Ms. Peden describes her art this way: "I don't make conceptual art, although I enjoy it. I wish it wasn't becoming so common. . . it has lost its freshness. Often it can get bogged down in formulas, pseudo-response, tricks and manipulation . . . perhaps that in itself is a comment on our society. That is a result of the "cutting edge" syndrome of the university circuit . . . it's done so many times it becomes dull. Like most artists, my art usually gropes around in the recesses of my soul for some kind of honest response . . . and if I connect, good things happen.

Peden feels that her challenge now is to bring that same honesty back with her; to see here a certain beauty of the spirit that she recognized in the women of Kabale, and to paint it. She longs for the appreciation of those "who are moved on gut level by the work, and can weave their own story into the images and colours of the canvas...that way the life of the work continues and the story grows richer..."

Ms. Peden is presently living in Canada with her husband and their last born child. She is painting, and learning printmaking.

I'm not out to try and belong to any societies. I am not out to follow any particular school of style or thought. I suspect I am rather common in my feelings and responses, right up there with most 47-something women who are experiencing their passages.

Beverley Peden's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Beverley Peden at bpeden@travel-net.com.


Sue Marquette Poremba

Sue Marquette Poremba is working on a master's degree in political science and women's studies, and has studied Alice Roosevelt Longworth and her father, Theodore Roosevelt, for 15 years. She is a co-owner of WWA-L.

Sue Marquette Poremba's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Sue Marquette Poremba at scp4@psu.edu.


Helen Redman

Helen Redman, age 56, is a widely exhibited figurative painter, feminist commentator, mother and grandmother. She shares her art in the context of life issues, combining reality, fantasy and message. Redman has been an active force in gaining support and recognition for women in the arts for over two decades. In 1974, she co-founded Front Range Women in the Visual Arts in Boulder, Colorado, and in 1992 she served as the first president of the SanDiego Women's Caucus for the Arts. Redman has taught fine arts classes at the University of Colorado, and was a Visiting Artist at the University of Iowa.

For the past few years she has been creating a unique series of drawings and paintings -- now more than 50 -- of her experience of menopause and aging. Her work for 35 years has centered on life passages: her own (including pregnancy, mothering, illness, healing and the death of a child) as well as various stages of her children's growth. Her art has always been connected to her life, and that of her family and community... all of which now brings her back to the ancient function of the artist as shaman, healer and educator.

Redman's work serves as a catalyst for others to explore the issues she raises, and for women to communicate their knowledge with one another. She presents her work in a diversity of forums -- from mental health, community and fine arts centers, to home and studio gatherings.

Selling prints of the work helps to keep the project financially alive (see Ordering Information). If you would like to sponsor the Birthing The Crone slide lecture and/or exhibition, please email redcrone@aol.com.

Some recent sponsors include:

Helen Redman's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Helen Redman at redcrone@aol.com.


Kristyn Rose

Kristyn Rose is a technical writer, who writes science fiction in her spare time. Kristyn Rose's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Kristyn Rose at krisrose@rollnet.org.


Linda Hampton Schiffer

I am primarily a visual artist but have been writing for many years. I am a quilter and have been doing more and more "art" quilting in recent years. I am also the coauthor of three books on foundation piecing/quilting. I am happy to be able to combine my love of fibers with my love of words in my current "job" as quilt author. :-)

I live in Columbia, Maryland with my beloved husband, Skip (an astronomer) and my two children, Eva (15) and Hugh (12). We also have four cats and three birds (the latter keep the former happily entertained from time to time). :)

Linda Hampton Schiffer's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Linda Hampton Schiffer at quilter@lhsdesigns.jagunet.com.


Martha L. Shockey, Ph.D.

Martha L. Shockey, Ph.D., has her doctorate degree in Sociology from the University of Iowa in Iowa City, Iowa. She is currently an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice at Appalachian State University in Boone, North Carolina. During her career, Dr. Shockey's research emphases have included studies of inequality, gender issues in the conventional labor market, and crime and deviance in contemporary US society. Those research interests intersect in her latest study, a qualitative exploration of prostitution as it is maintained and plays itself out in a distinct Midwestern metropolitan region of the United States known as the Quad Cities. In her latest research, Dr. Shockey attempts merely to "tell the story of prostitution" through the sex worker's own words and accounts of their lived experiences in the unconventional labor market.

Martha L. Shockey's work in this issue of Moondance:

Comments can be sent to Martha L. Shockey at shockeyml@conrad.appstate.edu.


Elisabeth Tjäderquist

Elisabeth Tjäderquist is a teacher. She teaches German and Swedish in Malung, a small village in the west of Sweden. She is married with no children. Elisabeth has two dogs, two society finches, and two goldfish.

Elisabeth Tjäderquist's work in this issue:

Comments can be sent to Elisabeth Tjäderquist at et@vdg.malung.se.


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